New publication: Coral reefs in the Gilbert Islands of Kiribati after more than a decade of multiple stressors

I'm thrilled to share the first publication from my Ph.D. dissertation research, out last month in the open-access journal PLoS One (and available for download here). This paper will be the first chapter of my dissertation, and it's great to (finally) see it out in the universe! Conducting surveys of reefs in Abaiang in 2018. … Continue reading New publication: Coral reefs in the Gilbert Islands of Kiribati after more than a decade of multiple stressors

How corals can help us make predictions about our future under climate change (cross-posted from ReefBites)

This blog post originally appeared on ReefBites, the student blog of the International Society for Reef Studies. Every two to seven years, the eastern equatorial Pacific climate oscillates between anomalously warm (El Niño) and cold (La Niña) conditions in a process known as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This process influences sea surface temperatures … Continue reading How corals can help us make predictions about our future under climate change (cross-posted from ReefBites)

Counting down to fieldwork in the Gilbert Islands

In just over a month, I'll be boarding a plane and heading to Tarawa, an atoll in the Gilbert Islands of Kiribati. I'll be staying in Tarawa and the nearby Abaiang Atoll for about a month to conduct the first stage of my Ph.D. fieldwork. It's been a long, dark, rainy winter in Vancouver and … Continue reading Counting down to fieldwork in the Gilbert Islands

Recent study of scientists and advocacy overlooks gender and racial biases

With the April 22 March for Science in Washington, DC quickly approaching and the current anti-scientific stance of the American government, the scientific community is abuzz with debate over what role scientists should play in activism. In the midst of these contentious times comes a new paper published in the journal Environmental Communication from George … Continue reading Recent study of scientists and advocacy overlooks gender and racial biases