New publication: Coral reefs in the Gilbert Islands of Kiribati after more than a decade of multiple stressors

I'm thrilled to share the first publication from my Ph.D. dissertation research, out last month in the open-access journal PLoS One (and available for download here). This paper will be the first chapter of my dissertation, and it's great to (finally) see it out in the universe! Conducting surveys of reefs in Abaiang in 2018. … Continue reading New publication: Coral reefs in the Gilbert Islands of Kiribati after more than a decade of multiple stressors

History doesn’t have to repeat itself: Looking back at the origins of biodiversity conservation shows that decolonization is necessary for just and effective steps forward

Last week, I spoke at my department's weekly seminar about the need to situate conservation as a field within both local and historical contexts. My argument was that this context is integral for preventing conservation efforts from causing harm in the future; essentially, we need to learn from the past in order to find ways … Continue reading History doesn’t have to repeat itself: Looking back at the origins of biodiversity conservation shows that decolonization is necessary for just and effective steps forward

New publication: Climate change denial and the jeopardized interests of the United States in the Freely Associated States of Micronesia

I am excited to share my new publication, Climate change denial and the jeopardized interests of the United States in the Freely Associated States of Micronesia! The paper was published in the journal Asia Pacific Viewpoint just before the holidays and I am thrilled to be able to share it with you here. In the … Continue reading New publication: Climate change denial and the jeopardized interests of the United States in the Freely Associated States of Micronesia

Decolonizing Conservation: A Reading List

The goal of the reading list is to help well-meaning non-Indigenous folks like myself educate ourselves on the colonial, white supremacist, and imperialist roots of biodiversity conservation around the world. May of us work in places with long histories of occupation and colonialism, where the impacts of colonialism are still ongoing, and no matter how well-intentioned, conservation work tends to continue those legacies. In order to stop perpetuating harm to Indigenous communities around the world, we need to start by understanding the many ways the work we do and the assumptions we make are informed by these historical frameworks.

How corals can help us make predictions about our future under climate change (cross-posted from ReefBites)

This blog post originally appeared on ReefBites, the student blog of the International Society for Reef Studies. Every two to seven years, the eastern equatorial Pacific climate oscillates between anomalously warm (El Niño) and cold (La Niña) conditions in a process known as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This process influences sea surface temperatures … Continue reading How corals can help us make predictions about our future under climate change (cross-posted from ReefBites)

“We are not drowning, we are fighting”: Pacific Islanders want you to know that they still have hope for their islands

This blog post originally appeared on the Ocean Leaders blog, which highlights the work of Ocean Leaders fellows. Please consider giving them a follow on social media at @oceanleaders on Twitter or OceanLeadersUBC on Facebook! This past weekend, I was on a discussion panel for the documentary film Anote’s Ark, which follows the former present of … Continue reading “We are not drowning, we are fighting”: Pacific Islanders want you to know that they still have hope for their islands

Corals are smelly and other anecdotes from the field

There are so many things to love about fieldwork. As scientists, it's an opportunity to finally get our hands dirty (so to speak) and interact with the systems we're studying. It's also invaluable to get to know the communities and people who live in the places we work (scientists commonly treat people as separate from … Continue reading Corals are smelly and other anecdotes from the field